A Clear Blue Sky on Mars

An Earthlike view of the 18,000-foot-high Mount Sharp (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

An Earthlike view of the 18,000-foot-high Mount Sharp (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

There’s nothing like a beautiful sunny day in Gale crater! The rusty sand crunching beneath your wheels, a gentle breeze blowing at a balmy 6º C (43º F), Mount Sharp rising in the distance into a clear blue sky… wait, did I just say blue sky?

Yes I did. But no worries — Mars hasn’t sprouted a nitrogen-and-oxygen atmosphere overnight. The image above is a crop from a panorama made of images from NASA’s Curiosity rover showing Gale crater’s central peak, Mount Sharp (officially Aeolis Mons.) Don’t let the blue sky fool you though — the lighting has been purposely adjusted to look like a sunlit scene on Earth… if only to let geologists more easily refer to their own experience when studying the Martian landscape.

Read the rest of this article here.

About these ads

About JPMajor

Desktop astronomer, graphic designer and space news nut.

Posted on March 16, 2013, in Mars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. lay low watch the universe expand I <3 Clutch

    Like

  2. “the lighting has been purposely adjusted to look like a sunlit scene on Earth…”

    It IS a sunlit scene!!! Just not on Earth. This makes the photo 40% less bright. Is there any other sources of light on Mars? So the image MUST show the actual color.

    Like

Have an opinion about this? Leave a comment:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 16,071 other followers

%d bloggers like this: